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The THC Under a Gibbous Moon by Manoj V Jain – Review

Manoj V Jain is another IIM, Ahmedabad alumni turning an author, this is his second book. His book The THC Under a Gibbous Moon is about Samar, Sanjaneka & Varun…. Loss, Longing & Changing Circumstances.

Book Blurb: ( As it is on the back of the cover)

“Now look at the person in the mirror and tell her that you love her.”

Sanjaneka stared and stared, unable to utter the simple words aloud.

Why is Sanjneka unable to love herself? What past is she running away from?

How does a Uber ride help Samar save his marriage?

Why does the dull moonlight of a gibbous moon trouble Varun so much?

Three lives. One Utopian center.

The Total Holistic Center (The THC) welcomes the broken and those looking for closure through it’s doors and works its magic to return them to the world fulfilled. This is the story of these three troubled souls who seek solace at the center, indulge in its unusual treatment and find the cures to their ailments in surprising places.

A book on loss, longing and changing circumstances. The THC dives into uncomfortable topics that are usually swept under the rug: fragile relationships, deteriorating marriages, addictions, impotence, and the delicate bond between fathers and sons.

The THC Under a Gibbous Moon by Manoj V Jain - Review

Pages: 194

Publisher: Notion Press

Publishing Date: 23 October, 2016

                             Book Links: The THC: Under a Gibbous Moon

My Rating: 3/5 Moons

The THC Under a Gibbous Moon by Manoj V Jain – Review

What began as a page turner slowed down as it moved on. The story begins with Samar’s entry into the THC. On his first day at lunch, he meets Sanjneka & Varun who becomes his friends during his inmate time. The THC is a holistic place and they do not allow much of the outer world “things” in the center while the patient is there for treatment. People from all over the world come to the imaginary place set 2 kilometers away from Mumbai to heal themselves, some people need to stay for a longer time and some only have a week or two.

Slowly the stories begin to unfold. Chapter one, two and three tells separate stories of Samar, Sanjneka and Varun respectively in the manner loss, longing & changing circumstances. So you know who is facing which issues.

Samar & Sanjneka’s stories include a lot of graphical sex scenes some of which were unnecessary. Samar’s friends talking and telling each other all about their private sexual lives was also unnecessary. Cutting all the unnecessary sex scenes from the story it will come around to 150 pages. We do not get to know much about the THC either. One of the treatments given to Samar seemed weird but funny, having tubes inserted through your back for the cleansing of an intestine because you smoke?  (I don’t know if it’s medically true or not but it is just weird.)

Much promoted LGBT side of the book/the issues are not as detailed. We do not get to know much about the THC either. One of the treatments given to Samar seemed weird but funny, having tubes inserted through your back for the cleansing of an intestine because you smoke?  (I don’t know if it’s medically true or not but it is just weird.)

What I loved?

The way the author played with his words and made the story readable for the better part.

What I disliked?

The way author used so many sexual scenes/references to elaborate the story which was unnecessary. Believe me, I have read my share of Mills & Boons and other adult novels but the scenes in this novel? *gross* Seriously felt like putting down the book.

Book summary says, “How does a Uber ride help Samar save his marriage? the answer, “Having sex at random” was baffling.

The story could have been much better if the author focused on writing a full story for just one or two of the characters, like Sanjneka, Varun and Jaiveer. Which is not my job to decide? So overall the author did a good job as expected from an IIM, Ahmedabad alumni.

In conclusion, the novel could have been a page-turner…

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4 Comments

  1. Smart review…

  2. Unnecessary sexual content can kill even a good book! Nice review…

    Wish you a great 2017 ahead… 🙂

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